Brookline Wants to Know Your Feelings

After many sessions of reading items from early 1990s teenage cruelty in comic form to exploring presidential assassinations, we are now moving on to even weirder, but probably awesome, reads. So far, we have seen and heard various emotional feedback; that is, having stories that make people angry, sad, happy, and confused. Luckily, this is exactly what we have been aiming for to make this Book Buzz group a true success.

How do this make you feel?!

How do this make you feel?!

Having said that, our next book happens to be a heavily debated novel, “Super Sad True Love Story” by Gary Shteyngart, where all the reviews (professional and personal) are solidly split between ‘best book I’ve ever read’ and ‘this is the worst thing I could have ever picked up.’ We can’t describe exactly how excited we are to hear about everyone’s reactions to this particularly questionable choice since it’s expected to receive everything from disgust to delight, and those silly feelings in between. You may question why we are seeking these strange feelings that are not just of simple delight and pleasing satisfaction following a good read, but let’s face it: Shouldn’t a read that is truly worth the effort make you think and cause you to react emotionally in all sorts of manner? If the book you have read only makes you smile peacefully or be bored by the end, then you are not experiencing the amazing worlds of literature in the right way.

A brief overview of “Super Sad True Love Story” (which is technically not a love story) from Publishers Weekly: “Mired in protracted adolescence, middle-aged Lenny Abramov is obsessed with living forever (he works for an Indefinite Life Extension company), his books (an anachronism of this indeterminate future), and Eunice Park, a 20-something Korean-American. Eunice, though reluctant and often cruel, finds in Lenny a loving but needy fellow soul and a refuge from her overbearing immigrant parents.” A tip of the iceberg summary, this book is a mess of political takeovers, a cartoon otter in a cowboy hat, alternating points-of-views (diary entries vs online correspondences), and the nightmare of tomorrow. We don’t know what to expect, we don’t know how you and we will feel, and we just don’t know what’s to come.

Join us at Cannon Coffee down the still-intact Brookline Boulevard to talk about how this book made you react while gulping down angry mugs of coffee, happy shots of espresso, and sad cups of tea. Check you later!

– Brookline crew

July and August Book Buzz Picks!

New books for you to read and discuss!

July 23, 7pm

Franktuary, 3810 Butler St.

The Unlikely Disciple / Kevin Roose

No drinking. No smoking. No cursing. No dancing. No R-rated movies. Kevin Roose wasn’t used to rules like these.  But when Roose leaves his Ivy League confines to spend a semester at Liberty University, a conservative Baptist school in Lynchburg, Virginia, obedience is no longer optional.

 

On July 23rd, come for Book Buzz – stay for trivia! Trivia @ Franktuary begins at 8pm.

 

August: The Jazz Age

 August 13th, 7pm

CLP – Lawrenceville

Rules of Civility / Amor Towles

Armed with little more than a formidable intellect, a bracing wit, and her own brand of cool nerve, Katey Kontent embarks on a journey from a Wall Street secretarial pool through the upper echelons of New York society in search of a brighter future.

 

August 27th, 7pm

720 Music, Clothes and Café, 4405 Butler St.

Jazz / Toni Morrison

The story of Joe Trace, a door-to-door salesman in his 50s, his mentally unstable wife, and his 18-year-old lover. Set in Harlem in the 1920s, the story captures the rhythms of the city and the bittersweet mood of African American life at a moment in our history we assumed we understood.